Obesity Management

Daisy Duan, M.D., Joshua J. Joseph, M.D.
Obesity Management is a topic covered in the Johns Hopkins Diabetes Guide.

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DEFINITION

  • Obesity:
    • Excess adipose tissue that affects health.
    • Defined clinically as a body mass index (BMI) of ≥ 30 kg/m2.[33]
    • Subdivided into Class 1 (BMI 30 - 34.9 kg/m2), Class 2 (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m2) and Class 3 (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2). Overweight is BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2.
    • Abdominal obesity, also known as central or visceral adiposity, is generally defined as a waist circumference ≥ 35 inches (88 cm) for women, or ≥ 40 inches (102 cm) for men and is indicative of increased cardiometabolic risk not captured by BMI.[19] Ethnic-specific cutoffs for waist circumference have also been proposed.

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DEFINITION

  • Obesity:
    • Excess adipose tissue that affects health.
    • Defined clinically as a body mass index (BMI) of ≥ 30 kg/m2.[33]
    • Subdivided into Class 1 (BMI 30 - 34.9 kg/m2), Class 2 (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m2) and Class 3 (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2). Overweight is BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2.
    • Abdominal obesity, also known as central or visceral adiposity, is generally defined as a waist circumference ≥ 35 inches (88 cm) for women, or ≥ 40 inches (102 cm) for men and is indicative of increased cardiometabolic risk not captured by BMI.[19] Ethnic-specific cutoffs for waist circumference have also been proposed.

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Last updated: November 14, 2021