Intravenous immune globulin

Edina Avdic, Pharm.D., Paul A. Pham, Pharm.D.
Pediatric Dosing Author: Lisa Hutchins , Pharm.D.
Intravenous immune globulin is a topic covered in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide.

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INDICATIONS

FDA

  • Bone marrow transplant (to prevent graft vs host disease)
  • Primary immunoglobulin deficiencies (hypogammaglobulinemia)
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)
  • Prevention of bacterial infections in HIV-infected children who are not receiving prophylaxis (FDA approved but generally not recommended)
  • Kawasaki disease
  • VZV post-exposure prophylaxis (if Varicella-Zoster immune globulin is not available)

NON-FDA APPROVED USES

  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemias
  • Pure red cell aplasia
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome
  • Steroid resistant dermatomyositis
  • Polymyositis
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Immune-mediated neutropenia
  • Post-transfusion purpura
  • Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia
  • Solid-organ transplant
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Systemic lupus diseases
  • Systemic vascular syndrome and vasculitis
  • Refractory seizures
  • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy
  • Stiff person syndrome
  • Paraneoplastic syndrome
  • Thrombocytopenia refractory to platelet transfusion
  • Immune deficiencies and immune regulatory disorders

Infectious Diseases Use

  • Measles post-exposure prophylaxis
  • Adjective therapy for RSV in the severely immunocompromised host (e.g. BMT)
  • Severe C. difficile-associated colitis
  • Anemia due to parvovirus B19 infection
  • CMV infections
  • BK virus nephropathy[1]

-- To view the remaining sections of this topic, please or --

INDICATIONS

FDA

  • Bone marrow transplant (to prevent graft vs host disease)
  • Primary immunoglobulin deficiencies (hypogammaglobulinemia)
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)
  • Prevention of bacterial infections in HIV-infected children who are not receiving prophylaxis (FDA approved but generally not recommended)
  • Kawasaki disease
  • VZV post-exposure prophylaxis (if Varicella-Zoster immune globulin is not available)

NON-FDA APPROVED USES

  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemias
  • Pure red cell aplasia
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome
  • Steroid resistant dermatomyositis
  • Polymyositis
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy
  • Multiple myeloma
  • Immune-mediated neutropenia
  • Post-transfusion purpura
  • Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia
  • Solid-organ transplant
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Systemic lupus diseases
  • Systemic vascular syndrome and vasculitis
  • Refractory seizures
  • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy
  • Stiff person syndrome
  • Paraneoplastic syndrome
  • Thrombocytopenia refractory to platelet transfusion
  • Immune deficiencies and immune regulatory disorders

Infectious Diseases Use

  • Measles post-exposure prophylaxis
  • Adjective therapy for RSV in the severely immunocompromised host (e.g. BMT)
  • Severe C. difficile-associated colitis
  • Anemia due to parvovirus B19 infection
  • CMV infections
  • BK virus nephropathy[1]

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Last updated: April 15, 2020