Johns Hopkins Author Bios

Thomas Inglesby (M.D.)

Background

  • Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases
  • Senior fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies
  • Medical staff, Johns Hopkins Hospital

Publications

  • Anthrax as a Biological Weapon: Medical and Public Health Management (JAMA)
  • Plague as a Biological Weapon: Medical and Public Health Consequences (JAMA)
  • A Plague on your City: Observations from TOPOFF (CID)
  • Smallpox as a Biological Weapon: Medical and Public Health Management (JAMA)
  • Botulinum Toxin as a Biological Weapon: Medical and Public Health Management (JAMA)
  • Anthrax: A Possible Case History (Emerging Infect. Dis.)
  • The Germs of War: How Biological Weapons Could Threaten the Civilian Population (Wash. Post)
  • Confronting Biological Weapons (CID)

Education

  • Residency: Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Board-Certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases
  • Sub-specialty training: Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
  • M.D.: Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • B.A.: Georgetown University

Societies

  • Principal organizer and chair of the program committee of the "2nd National Symposium on the Medical and Public Health Consequence of Bioterrorism" 2000
  • Conference participant leading to the document "Critical Agents for Biopreparedness", Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1999
  • Committee revising "The 1996 Olympic Clinical Treatment Protocols for Casualties Resulting from Terrorist Incidents Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction."

Previous Appointments

  • Assistant Chief of Service at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Medicine.

Disclosures

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Last updated: January 26, 2011